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The University of Hawaiʻi Community Colleges (UHCC), having just celebrated fifty years of contributing to creating higher education opportunities for Hawaiʻi's citizens, are poised to have an even greater impact going forward. The need couldn't be more critical. All economic forecasts indicate most U.S. citizens in the near future will need some kind of postsecondary credential to enjoy a living wage occupation and for their local economies to compete in the global workforce. In recognition of this fact, the State of Hawaiʻi through its P-20 Council has established a goal of ensuring that 55% of Hawaiʻi's working-age residents have at least an associate's degree by 2025. This strategic plan, built on the student success agenda of UH Community Colleges over the past six years and aligned with the University of Hawaiʻi Strategic Directions, is designed to create the opportunity, the success, the economy, and the quality of life desired by Hawaiʻi for its residents.

The plan is based on several key principles:

  • Access to higher education should be universally available to Hawaiʻi residents and the cost of attending should not be a barrier to anyone's participation;
  • Student success, measured in terms of completion of certificates, degrees, or transfer of students, is of first priority. Access without success is not access to the benefits and opportunities afforded by higher education;
  • The quality of the educational programs as measured by student success in subsequent courses, in the workplace, and in the community must be maintained;
  • Students can be successful in these quality programs when provided with the right system of support and guidance;
  • UH Community Colleges are an integral component of the workforce development in the state and a leader in identifying workforce needs and developing and delivering training programs to enable students to gain employment;
  • As part of the University of Hawaiʻi System, the UH Community Colleges have the opportunity and responsibility to create smooth and effective pathways from the Department of Education through the UH Community Colleges to baccalaureate programs for those students seeking baccalaureate education; and
  • The UH Community Colleges should be a model of a high performing organization in terms of sustainability, business practices, and providing a learning environment reflecting modern technologies and pedagogies.

Over the past two years, the UH Community Colleges have developed this plan by leveraging the work done in the previous strategic planning period, 2008-2015. That plan set the tone for a focused, student success oriented mission with a strong commitment to Native Hawaiʻian access and success. The result was a dramatic increase in graduation and transfer; enrollment, graduation, and transfer of Native Hawaiian students; student enrollment in and graduation from Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs; and a fivefold increase in federal grant aid supporting students in the community colleges. The UH Community Colleges have a shared commitment to student success, a commitment to a deeper understanding of what works and what doesn't work in promoting that success, and a willingness to try new approaches to achieve higher levels of student success. With that spirit and a lot of hard work, this new plan will help ensure a bright future for Hawaiʻi.

The plan is comprised of the following sections.

  • Hawaiʻi Graduation Initiative - increasing the number of graduates and transfers and on the momentum to get students through to graduation and transfer more quickly.
  • Hawaiʻi Innovation Initiative - workforce development linked to developing emerging sectors in Hawaiʻi's economy while simultaneously providing a stable workforce for the traditional employment sectors.
  • Modern Teaching and Learning Environments - ensuring that students and faculty have the learning and teaching environments appropriate for the 21st century and the sustainability practices to maintain those environments.
  • High Performance Mission-Driven System - practices and policies that capitalize on the University of Hawaiʻi being a single system of higher education in the state that can provide students with smooth transitions from K-12 through the community colleges to the baccalaureate institutions in the most productive, cost-effective, and results-oriented manner possible.
  • Enrollment - the identification and goals for targeted currently underserved populations.
  • Implementing the Plan - the policy, practice, and communication models needed to ensure the overall success of this strategic plan.

The Hawaiʻi Graduation Initiative is the UH System's commitment to increase the educational capital of the state by increasing the participation and completion rates of students, particularly Native Hawaiians, low-income students, and those from underserved regions and populations and preparing these students for success in the workforce and their communities. The UH Community Colleges share this commitment, including increasing the transfer rates and success of its students. The UHCC HGI effort includes the following dimensions:

Graduation
Graduation with an Associate Degree or a one-year Certificate of Achievement (CA) provides the greatest lifetime economic value for community college students and attaining those credentials is a major focus of the student success agenda. It is recognized that there are many other short-term certificates and credentials, both credit and noncredit, that are offered by the community colleges but this metric focuses on student attainment of the higher value credentials. The goal is to increase the number of associate degrees by 5% per year in order to maintain progress toward the P-20 goal of having 55% of working age adults with a college degree by 2025.

Graduation trends chart


Graduation (Associate Degree and Certificate of Achievement)
Targets By Campus

 

Base*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

597

627

658

691

725

762

800

HON

653

686

720

756

794

833

875

KAP

1,347

1,414

1,485

1,559

1,637

1,719

1,805

KAU

228

239

251

264

277

291

305

LEE

953

1,001

1,051

1,104

1,159

1,217

1,278

MAU

612

643

675

708

744

781

820

WIN

315

331

347

365

383

402

422

UHCC1

4,705

4,941

5,187

5,446

5,719

6,004

6,305

1May not equal sum of individual colleges due to rounding. Goals were reset in 2016.
*Baseline (Average of FY13, FY14 and FY15)

Tactics

  • Establish clear structured pathways for each degree for both full-time and part-time students;
  • Enhance student management of degree completion through getting students on a degree pathway early and using STAR to guide student registration and progress toward the degree;
  • Deploy new block scheduling where appropriate;
  • Accelerate "time-to-college" ready status for students at one or two levels below the college-ready standard;
  • Increase intrusive advising techniques to identify and intervene when students are at risk of dropping out;
  • Deploy new advising/counseling strategies to enhance success of high risk students, including engaging other community programs;
  • Develop easy re-entry programs for students who must stop out;
  • Deploy initiatives to achieve higher participation in the "15 to Finish" initiative, including moving to year-round programs at regular tuition rates;
  • Continue programs like reverse transfer and automatic posting of credentials to assure that students are awarded any credential they earn;
  • Provide program and other academic managers with tools to track and manage student progress through to completion; and
  • Use the Student Success Council to identify obstacles that may inhibit attaining this metric and strategies to overcome the obstacles.

Native Hawaiian Graduation
Native Hawaiian student success remains of paramount importance to the UH Community Colleges as we strive to fulfill our obligation to be a model indigenous serving institution. Over the past six years, Native Hawaiian student enrollment, graduation, and transfer have all more than doubled. This plan seeks to sustain that progress and to eliminate any gaps in the graduation of Native Hawaiian students compared to the overall student population. The Native Hawaiian graduation targets combine this elimination of any gaps in graduation numbers, that is, Native Hawaiian graduates should be at the same percentage as their enrollment percentage, with the overall planned graduation increases for all students.

Native Hawaiian Student Graduation trends chart


Native Hawaiian Student Graduation (Associate Degree and Certificate of Achievement)
Targets by Campus

 

Base*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

236

248

260

273

287

301

316

HON

164

172

181

190

200

210

221

KAP

191

201

211

222

233

245

257

KAU

60

63

66

69

72

76

80

LEE

228

239

251

264

277

291

306

MAU

160

168

176

185

194

204

214

WIN

126

132

139

146

153

161

169

UHCC1

1,165

1,222

1,283

1,347

1,414

1,485

1,559

1May not equal sum of individual colleges due to rounding. Goals were reset in 2016.
*Baseline (Average of FY13, FY14 and FY15)

Tactics

  • Further develop Native Hawaiian student success centers on each campus that incorporate peer and professional advising and mentoring, cultural activities, student leadership development, and other support systems based on Native Hawaiian values and practices;
  • Develop programs that target and serve populations in geographic regions with large Native Hawaiian populations;
  • Develop programs that target Native Hawaiian males for both enrollment and graduation success; and
  • Strengthen relationships with Kamehameha Schools, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and other organizations who share the mission of educating Native Hawaiian students;
  • Increase the number of Native Hawaiian faculty, staff, and administrators.

Low Income Student (Pell Recipients) Graduation
Community colleges, with their lower cost of attendance, are of critical importance in providing access to higher education for low-income students. Through aggressive outreach to students and their parents, the number of Pell recipients significantly increased over the past six years. As a result, the amount of Federal Pell aid increased from $8 million to over $38 million. While the efforts to secure financial support for students will continue, this plan focuses on ensuring that the access for low-income students results in graduation as well.

Analysis shows that Pell recipients graduate at a rate at, or over, their enrollment percentage. Accordingly, the target in this plan is based on ensuring that the growth in the number of low-income graduates is at the same rate of growth as the overall planned growth for graduates.

Graduates with Pell Grants



Low-Income (Pell Recipient) Graduation (Associate Degree and Certificate of Achievement)
Targets by Campus

 

Base*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

418

439

461

484

508

533

560

HON

269

282

296

311

327

343

360

KAP

556

584

613

644

676

710

746

KAU

123

129

135

142

149

156

164

LEE

455

478

502

527

553

581

610

MAU

370

389

408

428

449

471

495

WIN

171

180

189

198

208

218

229

UHCC1

2,362

2,480

2,604

2,734

2,871

3,015

3,166

Note: The degrees and certificates will be counted if the student received a Pell grant at any time during his or her enrollment.
1May not equal sum of individual colleges due to rounding. Goals were reset in 2016.
*Baseline (Average of FY13, FY14 and FY15)

Tactics

  • Increase financial aid assistance so that all students will receive 100% of their unmet direct cost (tuition, fees, and books) from grant sources, that is, without student loans;
  • Develop stronger working relationships with other public benefit programs to ensure that low-income students have access to child care, housing, transportation, and other support while attending college; and
  • Expand the Waiʻaleʻale program(s) to all campuses and incorporate the successes of those programs into regular support of low-income students.

Transfer
Over the past six years, the number of transfers from the community colleges has steadily increased but not at the same rate of increase as either enrollment or graduation. Analysis has also revealed that there is a substantial transfer to non-UH baccalaureate institutions, particularly among older students, with UH transfers accounting for 60% of the overall transfers and non-UH institutions the other 40%. The targeted goal is to increase the overall UHCC baccalaureate transfers 6% per year.

UHCC Transfers to Baccalaureate Institutions



Baccalaureate Transfer Targets by Campus

 

Base*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

398

405

425

446

469

492

517

HON

518

526

553

580

609

640

672

KAP

1,327

1,349

1,416

1,487

1,561

1,639

1,721

KAU

183

186

195

205

215

226

237

LEE

1,296

1,316

1,382

1,451

1,523

1,600

1,680

MAU

531

539

565

594

623

655

687

WIN

442

449

471

495

520

546

573

UHCC1

4,328

4,395

4,615

4,658

4,845

4,891

5,088

1May not equal sum of individual colleges due to rounding. Goals were reset in 2016.
*Baseline (Average of FY13, FY14 and FY15)

Tactics

  • Establish clear structured pathways for the highest volume baccalaureate degrees for both full-time and part-time students;
  • Expand distance delivery and other shared delivery of courses critical to student transfer pathways;
  • Establish meta-major or other pathways for undecided students;
  • Enhance student management of transfer completion through getting students on a transfer pathway early and using STAR to guide student registration and progress toward their baccalaureate degree;
  • Expand the policies and practices in Kaʻieʻie to provide students with advising, registration priority, peer mentors, and transfer orientation support;
  • Develop expanded financial aid for students in their baccalaureate transfer; and
  • Work with UH baccalaureate institutions to offer more opportunities for distance education and evening/weekend degrees and for upper division courses on community college campuses.

Eliminating Access and Success Gaps for Targeted Populations
The UH Community Colleges play a vital role in ensuring access to the benefits of higher education for all Hawaiʻi's citizens. In fulfilling that mission, the commitment is that there should be no achievement gaps for any of the populations normally considered unrepresented in higher education. This plan commits to eliminate gaps in enrollment, graduation, STEM graduation, and transfer for these targeted populations:

  • Native Hawaiian
  • Filipino
  • Pacific Islander
  • Low-income (Pell recipients)
By 2021, the enrollment percentage of a targeted population should be equal to, or greater than, the percentage in the overall population served by the college. And the percentage of graduates, STEM graduates, and transfers for the targeted population should be equal to, or greater than, the enrollment percentage of the targeted population.

The following tables establish the baseline for these gap reductions.

Native Hawaiian Student Gap Analysis

 

U.S. Census

Fall 2014 Enrollment

All Degrees & CAs FY 2014

**STEM Degrees & CAs FY 2014

Transfer to 4 year program

HAW

33%

43%

*37%

*26%

*34%

HON

18%

25%

28%

*19%

*22%

KAP

13%

17%

*15%

*10%

*15%

KAU

22%

31%

*24%

36%

*26%

LEE

24%

28%

*23%

*11%

*23%

MAU

24%

30%

*25%

*15%

36%

WIN

33%

42%

*38%

*27%

37%

UHCC

21%

35%

*25%

*15%

*24%

*Did not achieve target.
** STEM at UHCC & former UHCC students at UH 4-year institutions.



Filipino Student Gap Analysis

 

U.S. Census

Fall 2014 Enrollment

All Degrees & CAs FY 2014

**STEM Degrees & CAs FY 2014

Transfer to 4 year program

HAW

10%

10%

11%

*9%

*6%

HON

13%

22%

*19%

*20%

*20%

KAP

3%

13%

13%

*10%

*11%

KAU

21%

19%

27%

21%

*13%

LEE

22%

23%

23%

29%

*19%

MAU

15%

20%

25%

26%

*12%

WIN

5%

5%

*4%

*0%

*3%

UHCC

15%

16%

17%

17%

*14%

*Did not achieve target.
** STEM at UHCC & former UHCC students at UH 4-year institutions.



Pacific Islander Student Gap Analysis

 

U.S. Census

Fall 2014 Enrollment

All Degrees & CAs FY 2014

**STEM Degrees & CAs FY 2014

Transfer to 4 year program

HAW

4%

*3%

*2%

*2%

*3%

HON

4%

*3%

*1%

*0%

12%

KAP

1%

2%

2%

2%

7%

KAU

1%

2%

*1%

*0%

5%

LEE

6%

*2%

*2%

*1%

10%

MAU

3%

*2%

*1%

*0%

5%

WIN

5%

*2%

*1%

*0%

*3%

UHCC

4%

*3%

*2%

*1%

8%

*Did not achieve target.
** STEM at UHCC & former UHCC students at UH 4-year institutions.



Low-Income (Pell Recipient) Student Gap Analysis

 

Fall 2014 Enrollment

All Degrees & CAs FY 2014

**STEM Degrees & CAs FY 2014

Transfer to 4 year program

HAW

64%

67%

*58%

*48%

HON

40%

*33%

*28%

*28%

KAP

39%

*38%

*38%

*27%

KAU

54%

57%

*33%

*30%

LEE

43%

44%

*40%

*27%

MAU

60%

*59%

*40%

*31%

WIN

60%

*48%

*43%

*38%

UHCC

48%

*47%

*38%

*30%

*Did not achieve target.
** STEM at UHCC & former UHCC students at UH 4-year institutions.

The tactics designed to eliminate these gaps are embedded in the other metrics. This view of the targets provides a clear indication of whether those tactics are being successful in eliminating the gaps for these populations.

Reduction in Time-to-Degree
Analysis shows that community college students engage in a pattern of enrollment that includes moving between full- and part-time status, stopping out and re-enrolling, or dropping out in frustration at the lack of progress. This pattern can be explained in part by the competing demands on the student from work and family but is also the result of the structure of requirements, offerings, and policies. The analysis also shows that the longer a student takes to complete a degree or certificate the higher the risk that the student will never complete. Two initiatives in this plan address the desire to reduce the student's time-to-degree.

Accelerating College Readiness
Most students come to the UH Community College not yet prepared to do college-level work in English and math. The traditional-sequential course-based approach to remediating these deficiencies has not resulted in students progressing to college readiness, much less to degree completion. Over the past six years, several initiatives both nationally and within the UH Community Colleges have begun to address this readiness issue through early identification and remediation before the student enrolls in college, through co-requisite rather than pre-requisite remediation, and through just-in-time strategies to supplement student learning in college level courses. The goal is to get a student "college ready" as quickly as possible with the skills to be successful in his or her degree program.

Metrics

  • 75% of students testing at one level below college-ready standards will complete their college-level English and/or math course within one semester.
  • 70% of students testing at two or more levels below college-ready standards will complete their college-level English or math course within one year.

Fall 2013 Achieving the Dream (ATD) Entering Cohort Status Math

 

HAW

HON

KAP

KAU

LEE

MAU

WIN

One level below college level

474

204

251

135

240

195

58

College ready in one semester

8%
(37)

14%
(28)

15%
(37)

33%
(44)

34%
(82)

28%
(54)

41%
(24)

College ready in two semesters

7%
(32)

12%
(25)

18%
(44)

12%
(16)

11%
(26)

9%
(18)

10%
(6)

 

Two levels below college level

52

115

94

50

398

342

107

College ready in two semesters

0

22%
(25)

23%
(22)

18%
(9)

26%
(102)

8%
(26)

17%
(18)

College ready in three (F13,S14,F14) semesters

4%
(2)

4%
(6)

5%
(5)

12%
(6)

7%
(26)

8%
(15)

2%
(2)




Fall 2013 Achieving the Dream (ATD) Entering Cohort Status Writing

 

HAW

HON

KAP

KAU

LEE

MAU

WIN

One level below college level

245

231

256

97

467

193

109

College ready in one semester

37%
(90)

59%
(137)

55%
(141)

44%
(43)

44%
(207)

54%
(104)

44%
(48)

College ready in two semesters

10%
(24)

9%
(20)

12%
(30)

8%
(8)

14%
(65)

6%
(12)

13%
(14)

 

Two levels below college level

94

156

n/a

70

170

82

 

76

College ready in two semesters

22%
(21)

31%
(49)

n/a

23%
(16)

49%
(83)

33%
(27)

11%
(8)

College ready in three
(F13,S14,F14) semesters

2%
(2)

1%
(1)

n/a

1%
(1)

0

1%
(1)

0

Tactics

  • Adopt a co-requisite model for remediation in both English and mathematics;
  • Provide effective supports for students enrolled in co-requisite based remediation, including supplemental instruction; 24x7 tutoring; peer mentoring, emporia, and other academic and counseling support;
  • Expand boot camp and other student readiness programs prior to enrollment in the semester; and
  • Expand iCan and other contextualized learning for the least prepared students.

Student Retention and Credit Accumulation
Analysis shows that students who return for their second year with 20 earned credits for full-time students, and 12 earned credits for part-time students, are much more likely to complete their degrees.

Metrics

  • Increase the year-to-year retention from 49% to 65% for all degree-seeking students.
  • Increase the percentage of full-time students who have earned 20 credits after one year from 45% to 65%.
  • Increase the percentage of degree seeking part-time students who have earned 12 credits after one year from 38% to 65%.
  • Increase the percentage of full-time students who graduate or transfer within 150% of entry from 33% to 60%.

Achieving the Dream (ATD) 2013 Entering Cohort Fall to Fall

 

HAW

HON

KAP

KAU

LEE

MAU

WIN

UHCC

Entering Cohort

861

923

1,571

341

1,612

788

547

6,643

Percent

48%

44%

53%

52%

50%

48%

46%

49%




Achieving the Dream (ATD) 2013 Entering Cohort Full Time (12+ Credits in Entering Fall) Earning 20 Credits in First Year

College and Fall FT Entering Cohort percent and number

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021
At 65%

HAW
52% (536)

52%
(277)

52%
(277)

52%
(277)

54%
(289)

56%
(300)

58%
(311)

60%
(322)

62%
(332)

65%
(348)

HON
42% (559)

42%
(235)

42%
(235)

42%
(235)

45%
(252)

49%
(274)

53%
(296)

57%
(319)

60%
(335)

65%
(363)

KAP
43% (932)

43%
(402)

43%
(402)

43%
(402)

46%
(429)

49%
(457)

53%
(494)

57%
(531)

60%
(559)

65%
(606)

KAU
52% (199)

52%
(103)

52%
(103)

52%
(103)

54%
(107)

56%
(111)

58%
(115)

60%
(119)

62%
123)

65%
129)

LEE
43% (956)

43%
(415)

43%
(415)

43%
(415)

46%
(440)

49%
(468)

53%
(507)

57%
(545)

60%
(574)

65%
(621)

MAU
47% (377)

47%
(178)

47%
(178)

47%
(178)

50%
(189)

53%
(200)

56%
(211)

59%
(222)

61%
(230)

65%
(245)

WIN
43% (310)

43%
(133)

43%
(133)

43%
(133)

46%
(143)

49%
(152)

53%
(164)

57%
(177)

60%
(186)

65%
(202)

UHCC
45% (3,869)

45%
1,742

45%
1,742

45%
1,742

49%
1,896

53%
2,051

56%
2,167

59%
2,283

60%
2,321

65%
2,515

2013 AtD Entering Cohort full time figure used to illustrate first year success to 65%. Actual numbers will vary according to yearly cohort size.



Achieving the Dream (ATD) Fall 2013 Entering Cohort Part-Time (6-11 Credits in Entering Fall)
Earning 12 Credits in First Year

College and Fall Entering Cohort percent and number

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021
At 65%

HAW
42% (256)

42%
(108)

42%
(108)

42%
(108)

46%
(118)

49%
(125)

53%
(136)

57%
(146)

60%
(154)

65%
(166)

HON
34% (272)

34%
(92)

34%
(92)

39%
(106)

44%
(120)

49%
(133)

54%
(147)

58%
(158)

61%
(166)

65%
(177)

KAP
35% (484)

35%
(170)

35%
(170)

39%
(189)

44%
(213)

49%
(237)

54%
(261)

58%
(281)

61%
(295)

65%
(315)

KAU
44% (112)

44%
(49)

44%
(49)

47%
(53)

50%
(56)

53%
(59)

56%
(63)

59%
(66)

62%
(69)

65%
(73)

LEE
40% (517)

40%
(205)

40%
(205)

42%
(217)

46%
(238)

49%
(253)

53%
(274)

57%
(295)

61%
(315)

65%
(336)

MAU
41% (284)

41%
(116)

41%
(116)

41%
(116)

46%
(131)

49%
(139)

53%
(151)

57%
(162)

60%
(170)

65%
(185)

WIN
33% (194)

33%
(64)

33%
(64)

39%
(76)

44%
(85)

49%
(95)

54%
(105)

58%
(113)

61%
(118)

65%
(126)

UHCC
38% (2,119)

38%
(805)

38%
(805)

38%
(805)

46%
(975)

49%
(1,038)

53%
(1,123)

57%
(1,208)

60%
(1,271)

65%
(1,377)




Improving Time-to-Degree and/or Transfer

 

HAW

HON

KAP

KAU

LEE

MAU

WIN

UHCC

Graduates

21%

15%

20%

18%

14%

17%

13%

17%

Transfers

13%

21%

17%

14%

18%

10%

17%

16%

Overall

34%

36%

37%

32%

32%

27%

30%

33%

Based on IPEDS 2011 First Time, Full Time, Degree-Seeking Cohort graduating and/or transferring within three years (150%)

Tactics

  • Place students on guided pathways as soon as possible and use the pathways to guide student course registration and progress toward their goal;
  • Fully develop early warning and intervention systems for students;
  • Expand service learning, undergraduate field and laboratory research, student employment, peer mentoring, and other strategies to encourage student engagement;
  • Develop financial incentives and rewards for timely progress toward degrees;
  • Provide easy means for students to take leave when necessary and to easily re-enroll;
  • Ensure that courses are available to allow students to stay on path toward timely graduation; and
  • Expand lower cost summer school options for students.

The University of Hawai'i System is vital to the state's economy in terms of ensuring a well-qualified workforce for the state but also as a contributor to that state economy through job creation based on its research and innovation activities. The UH System goal is to create more high-quality jobs and diversify Hawai'i's economy by leading the development of a $1 billion innovation, research, education, and training enterprise that addresses the challenges and opportunities faced by Hawai'i and the world.

The UHCC System plays a critical role in building the mid-level technical workforce in virtually all sectors of Hawai'i's economy and in creating rapid response solutions to specific work force needs, to ameliorate workforce dislocations, to provide pathways into living wage jobs at both the technical and baccalaureate level for Hawai'i residents, to provide skill upgrades for incumbent workers, and to provide second chance educational opportunities for individuals who may have left the workforce or who wish to change or advance in their careers. The UH Community Colleges carry out this workforce mission through a variety of degree and certificate programs linked to local industry and through short-term training and certificates often delivered through non-degree and non-credit methods.

In developing these training programs, the UH Community Colleges must design programs to support and link the outcomes to existing and emerging jobs within Hawai'i's economy, ensure that students have the necessary technical and soft skills to be successful in those jobs, and to also educate students to be able to adapt to and advance in what is a rapidly changing workforce and new opportunities. Students must understand clearly what the structured pathways are to the credential but also the employment opportunities and earnings potential that the credential provides. Students must also understand clearly how and whether the credential leads to further education and further advancement through laddered programs and career advancement. Finally, the UH Community Colleges need to know whether their students are finding jobs, are performing well in those jobs, and advancing over their careers.

While elements of this type of workforce system already exist, this plan outlines a strategy to develop a more robust workforce planning and management system while at the same time committing the UH Community Colleges to developing and delivering degree and certificate programs in already identified emerging workforce areas such as cyber security, information technology, and big data, sustainability and emerging green jobs, sustainable agriculture, biotechnology, medicine, engineering, digital media, and other high tech occupations.

Developing a Robust Workforce Planning and Management System
A new planning and management system will be implemented by 2016 and refined over the next several years. The new system will have the following characteristics:

  • The tool will be economic sector based and will include each of the workforce sectors within Hawai'i that have links to educational programs within the community colleges. The sectors will be aligned with state workforce and economic development planning, including private sector planning efforts such as those of the Business Roundtable, Chamber of Commerce, and the Economic Development Alliance.
  • The system will include information on workforce demand, skills, credential, and/or certification requirements, and earnings potential in each sector and will be informed by examining:
  • Labor market information including real-time job openings and analysis;
  • Planning documents from state and counties on economic development strategies and their related e-workforce requirements;
  • Wage earning information including information from the State Longitudinal Data System;
  • Student interest, enrollment, and graduation data; and
  • Focused consultation and consultation with Public/Private Working Groups to help analyze the trend data and its implications for program development and delivery.
  • The analysis will be carried out at both at the state and county level.
  • The UHCC programs, both credit and non-credit, as well as baccalaureate program offerings, will be mapped against the sector categories. One model for such a mapping is based on the sectors visualization work of the Colorado Community College system.




    The results of this system will be used to frame discussions about whether the educational and training program mix throughout the system properly represents the demand as well as the regional needs for programs. Data from the system can be shared with students about the employment and wage earning potential for programs, with academic program managers to help with aligning employment skills, credentials, and demand with existing programs within the UH Community Colleges, with academic administrators and faculty planning new programs, and with policy makers on the gaps or discontinuities that may exist between desired economic conditions and the UHCC offerings.

Creating a Better Understanding of the Economic Value-Added Measure of Community College Credentials
In order to better assess the economic value-added measure of programs offered and completed by students, the UHCC system will develop a tracking system to fully understand employer needs, graduate placement, graduate earnings and advancement, and needs for further education and training. The current job placement and student follow-up systems are inconsistent in providing accurate information about student employment and wage earning after graduation or transfer.

The new tracking system will build on the State Longitudinal Data System (SLDS) to obtain information about student employment, earnings, and wage growth after graduation. The SLDS information will be supplemented by other post-graduation follow-up through:

  • Student job placement information;
  • Alumni contact and social media;
  • Faculty knowledge of student placement; and
  • Direct contact with employers and former students.
The system will focus on obtaining not only wage and earning data but also student and employer satisfaction with the technical skills, soft skills, and other readiness for the positions the student enters. The intent is also to develop a long-term relationship with the students so that they would seek to re-enter community colleges for future education or workplace skill enhancement.

Increase the STEM Workforce
Both the UH innovation agenda and the state's economic planning target a significant growth in STEM-related jobs. The UH Community Colleges provide both mid-level technician training in these areas and a pathway for students seeking baccalaureate or higher education in STEM fields.

Metrics

  • Increase the number of STEM graduates in STEM related Associate Degree and Certificate of Achievement programs and in UH awarded baccalaureate degrees in STEM to UHCC transfers by 5% per year for the first three years and 6% per year for the next three years.
  • Eliminate any gaps in STEM graduation for Native Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islander, and Pell recipient students.

STEM Graduates at UH Community Colleges and to Former UHCC Students at UH 4-Year Institutions



STEM Graduates Total

 

Base*

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

42

44

46

48

51

53

56

HON

110

115

121

127

133

140

147

KAP

196

206

215

227

238

249

262

KAU

12

13

13

14

14

16

16

LEE

115

121

127

133

140

146

153

MAU

46

48

51

54

56

59

62

WIN

43

45

47

49

52

54

57

UHCC1

564

593

623

654

686

721

757

1May not equal sum of individual colleges due to rounding. Goals were reset in 2016.
*Baseline (Average FY13, FY14, and FY15)

Tactics

  • Automate the Structured Pathway Project and use results to make pathway experiences seamless throughout system; adopt new counseling strategies to place students on pathways, assess student capacity for success on chosen pathway, help student make a new pathway decision if needed.
  • Create specific pathways into baccalaureate programs in data science and cybersecurity, biotechnology, engineering, physical sciences, and other demand fields, using meta majors such as the Associate in Science in Natural Science (ASNS) degree where appropriate.
  • Extend the pathways to Department of Education (DOE) STEM initiatives.
  • Increase student STEM readiness and success through summer bridge programs and calculus readiness approaches.
  • Increase field based activities and undergraduate research opportunities as a way to engage students in STEM education.
  • Identify strategies using distance and hybrid education to allow students from neighbor island and small O'ahu campuses to pursue STEM careers.

Students learn best when they are taught in an environment that is clean, safe, and well maintained, that is designed and equipped to meet the modern standards of faculty and industry, and that enables and takes advantage of high-speed digital technology. This plan seeks to create that type of environment for all UHCC campuses and learning centers, both physical and virtual. This will be accomplished through first and foremost a commitment to creating a sustainable environment on campus, through the implementation and execution of a building and grounds maintenance program that minimizes any deferred maintenance, through the creation and implementation of design standards for classrooms and laboratories that reflect modern teaching approaches, through ensuring that equipment is current and meeting industry standards, and through developing and maintaining a high speed digital environment on all campuses.

Sustainability
The University of Hawai'i Board of Regents has modified the University's mission to include an explicit commitment to creating a sustainable future for the University and State. To implement that new BOR policy, the president has issued a UH Executive Policy that commits the University to focusing on sustainability by:

  • Adopting aggressive energy conservation and co-generation goals so that UH would become carbon neutral by 2050;
  • Expanding the use of locally produced food products to help create food sustainability within the islands;
  • Developing instructional and research programs focused on sustainability issues;
  • Better incorporating sustainability practices into operations; and
  • Serving as role models and consultants to the community on sustainability.
Over the past 6 years, the UHCC System has implemented an energy efficiency initiative that has reduced energy usage by 18%. New buildings and major renovations have been built to LEED silver or higher standards. Photovoltaic co-generation has been initiated on several campuses and campus sustainability efforts have been recognized by national organizations. Even with these gains, there is substantial work yet to be completed if the UH Community Colleges are to fully incorporate the principles of sustainability into all aspects of its operations and organizational culture. This plan commits us to that goal.

Metrics

  • By 2016, each campus will develop its sustainability plan as required by the UH Executive Policy. In developing these plans, the colleges should consider their contribution to the following overall system goals:
    • By 2021, the UHCC system will reach a 30% reduction in energy usage per square foot compared to the 2008 base year.
    • By 2021, the UHCC system will generate 15% of its energy through photovoltaic and other co-generation strategies.
    • By 2021, 25% of the food produced in the UHCC culinary programs and food service facilities will be from local sources.
Tactics
  • Continue to execute energy reduction strategies, including metered auditing and monitoring of energy usage;
  • Explore new funding models for energy conservation projects that re-invest savings into new projects;
  • Expand PV installations or cooperate with large scale University PV implementations;
  • Explore and model new technologies such as battery storage;
  • Work to modify procurement to allow favored purchasing of local food product. Work with farmers to create a local supply and/or value added products for use by the colleges;
  • Develop training programs for green-related jobs in the state;
  • Incorporate sustainability concepts into existing courses and/or create new degree programs or tracks as appropriate; and
  • Develop community-oriented sustainability workshops, consultations, and demonstration projects.

Building and Grounds Maintenance Program
The University system in general has been plagued with a very large deferred maintenance backlog. While the UH Community Colleges, partly because of the side benefit of its energy efficiency programs, has a lower deferred maintenance backlog, this plan commits the community colleges to developing an on-going program of regular maintenance that eliminates the backlog that does exist and ensures that no significant new backlog will develop.

Metrics

  • The current deferred maintenance backlog within the UH Community Colleges will be reduced to no more than 10% of the required Capital Renewal budget of the UHCC System by 2017.
  • Once reduced to the target level, the deferred maintenance backlog will never exceed 10% of the required Capital Renewal budget of the UHCC system in future years.

Tactics

  • Develop transparent, accountable, efficient and effective processes and supportive organizational structures for construction, renewal and maintenance of facilities to include all phases from planning and procurement through project management and acceptance.
  • Reallocate current funding and seek new funding to properly address renovation, redesign, and maintenance for 21st century positioning avoiding in the process a buildup of deferred maintenance.

Modern Teaching and Learning Environments
The continued rapid expansion of digital technologies has an impact on how teachers teach and how students learn. As industry adopts these new technologies, there is the added responsibility to ensure that students going to work in those industries are exposed to the type of equipment and the applications they will use on the job.

This plan proposes to create these environments by addressing three different components of the ideal learning environment:

Instructional Classrooms, Laboratories, and Support Facilities
While the maintenance program outlined above addresses the general condition of buildings and grounds, there is also a need to examine whether the interior spaces are designed and equipped to serve as modern teaching spaces.

By 2016, a Modern Facilities Task Force will be created and develop the following:

  • Establish standards on what requirements different learning spaces require to support modern or desired instructional pedagogy in that space. These standards will include not only the physical layout but also the digital and media requirements, furniture requirements, laboratory and shop requirements, and other required contributions to creating the modern teaching space;
  • Review and evaluate which standards should be applied to each space currently within our facilities;
  • Identify what gaps or shortfalls exist between the current and the desired learning environment;
  • Establish a priority for addressing the shortfalls with the understanding that some improvements may require major renovations while others could have lower cost solutions.
The plan will then be used to map out planned renovations and improvements across the campuses.  

Capital Equipment Replacement
Capital equipment is defined as equipment with a value of $5,000 or more. Often this equipment is purchased on a cash available basis by the campus and, when cash is not available, the equipment simply becomes inoperable. This plan commits to using Kuali to help develop a system of planned equipment replacement, similar to the building maintenance plan, that accounts for the expected life of equipment, the cost of replacement, and a system-wide budget for capital equipment replacement. By approaching the replacement of equipment as a system, the impact on campus budgets will be modulated so that large items do not impact the budget in unexpected ways. The clear identification of a replacement schedule would also provide a clearer picture of the amount of "deferred" equipment within the system.

High-speed Digital Infrastructure
The UH System has created a very high-speed digital network connecting all campuses, learning centers, libraries, and DOE schools. This plan commits the UH Community Colleges to ensuring that the on-campus networks are constructed and maintained in a manner that takes full advantage of this intercampus network.

Working with UH Information Technology Services and drawing on the planning work of the Modern Facilities Task Force, the UH Community Colleges will assess all of its internal campus networks to assure that they provide the required high-speed connectivity to the teaching and learning space, to the business operations, and to the students in general. Necessary upgrades will be implemented based on this assessment.

Implementing the goals and reaching the targets in this plan are enabled if the UH Community Colleges accept the challenges facing all of higher education while optimizing the advantages of being part of a single system of higher education. The UH Community Colleges will identify and change processes and structures that potentially impede student progress or student success or that keep UH Community Colleges from creating responsive and efficient decision-making structures and policies. Keeping student costs low and opportunities and performance high are the main drivers behind much of the new UHCC Strategic Plan and the actions of the UHCC System. In that spirit, this plan commits the UH Community Colleges to

  • Minimize the cost of higher education while maintaining quality;
  • Maximize alternative revenue streams other than state general funds and student tuition;
  • Develop and support technology driven solutions such as STAR that promote student acceleration and expose obstacles in scheduling, completion, and retention;
  • Develop and support business and management practices that provide high quality service and which provide managers with high quality information on which to base plans and actions;
  • Fully implement the recommendations of Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao; and
  • Develop a robust professional development program that focuses on the changing pedagogies related to distance education, flipped classrooms, smart devices, simulations, collaborative learning, and other strategies to improve student engagement and learning.

Reducing the Cost of Education for Students
The tuition, fees, and book cost of attending a community college should be eliminated as a barrier or consideration for all students. Analysis of unmet need shows the UH Community Colleges to be approximately $3 million short of delivering on this commitment to its current students. This gap will be eliminated through:

  • Expanded private fundraising for need based scholarships;
  • Expanded partnerships with other organizations or employers who can support the direct costs experienced by students;
  • Further expansion of student use of available federal and other non-UH sources of support; and
  • Adoption of Open Education Resources to replace textbooks, with most textbooks replaced by the year 2021.

Maximizing Alternate Revenue Streams
The potential alternate revenue streams identified include:

  • Increased efficiency in business practices. The target is to achieve a 10% efficiency reduction in expenditures which would generate about $20 million in revenue for new programs or services; and
  • Increased revenue from non-credit workforce development training and contracts that can support reinvestment in equipment, professional development, and program operational support;

Double Three-Year Average by 2021
    FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021
  3 Yr avg of Non-Credit 12% Growth 12% Growth 12% Growth 12% Growth 12% Growth 12% Growth
HON $621,300 $695,856 $779,359 $872,882 $977,628 $1,094,943 $1,226,336
KAP $544,131 $609,427 $682,558 $764,465 $856,201 $958,945 $1,074,018
LEE $1,122,651 $1,257,369 $1,408,253 $1,577,243 $1,766,512 $1,978,493 $2,215,912
WIN $161,952 $181,386 $203,152 $227,530 $254,834 $285,414 $319,664
HAW $567,060 $635,107 $711,320 $796,678 $892,279 $999,352 $1,119,274
MAU $646,894 $724,521 $811,464 $908,840 $1,017,901 $1,140,049 $1,276,855
KAU $273,526 $306,349 $343,111 $384,284 $430,398 $482,046 $539,892
TOTAL $3,937,514 $4,410,015 $4,939,217 $5,531,922 $6,195,753 $6,939,242 $7,771,951

  • Increased revenue from private fund-raising from the current average revenue of $9,885,191 to $19,770,383 per year. This money can support students, professional development, and innovation;

  Base FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021 FY 2022
HAW $129,798 $151,431 $173,064 $194,697 $216,330 $237,963 $259,596
HAW-P $1,765,835 $2,060,140 $2,354,446 $2,648,752 $2,943,058 $3,237,363 $3,531,669
HON $244,433 $285,172 $325,911 $366,650 $407,389 $448,127 $488,866
KAP $3,821,457 $4,458,367 $5,095,276 $5,732,186 $6,369,095 $7,006,005 $7,642,914
KAU $871,237 $1,016,443 $1,161,650 $1,306,856 $1,452,062 $1,597,268 $1,742,474
LEE $566,469 $660,880 $755,292 $849,703 $944,115 $1,038,526 $1,132,938
MAU $1,412,141 $1,647,497 $1,882,854 $2,118,211 $2,353,568 $2,588,924 $2,824,281
WIN $1,073,822 $1,252,792 $1,431,763 $1,610,733 $1,789,703 $1,968,673 $2,147,644
UHCC $9,885,191 $11,532,723 $13,180,255 $14,827,787 $16,475,319 $18,122,851 $19,770,383

  • Increased indirect cost revenue (RTRF) from grants by increasing grant production from the current five-year average of $35 million per year to $50 million. These RTRF funds can be used to support innovation, new program development and startup costs, renovation, and other quality improvements; and
  • Increased partnerships with business and industry to share facilities, equipment, specialized teaching expertise, and other potential cost reduction items. This will partially be accomplished by maturing the Public Private Working Group concept.
Each of these strategies will be aggressively pursued over the period of this plan.

New Support Systems for Managing Students and Business Processes
The UH Community Colleges are committed along with the rest of the UH System to several enhancements to improve service to students, to better manage the student experience, to improve the quality of information available to managers, and to improve our understanding of the factors that contribute to student success. These improvements include:

  • Continued development of STAR as the engine to manage guided student pathways including the deployment of STAR as the student registration interface;
  • Development of services and information for students for use on mobile devices;
  • Improved data systems for management purposes, including data exchange with the DOE;
  • Improved analytic capability using predictive analytics for student success;
  • Improved financial management systems to monitor expenditures and budget controls; and
  • Improved enrollment management systems.

Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao
The University of Hawai'i mission statement explicitly recognizes its responsibility to the Native Hawaiian population stating

  • …As the only provider of public higher education in Hawai'i, the University embraces its unique responsibilities to the indigenous people of Hawai'i and to Hawai'i's indigenous language and culture. To fulfill this responsibility, the University ensures active support for the participation of Native Hawaiians at the University and supports vigorous programs of study and support for the Hawaiian language, history, and culture…
The Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao report articulates the University vision in meeting this obligation and vision of being a model indigenous serving institution. This strategic plan commits the UH Community Colleges to implement fully the recommendations of Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao in the areas of:
  • Leadership Development;
  • Community Engagement; and
  • Hawaiian Language and Cultural Parity.
This includes adopting the benchmarks identified in the Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao report.
  • Hawaiian enrollment at parity with Hawaiians in the Hawaiʻi state population.
  • Hawaiian students performing at parity with non-Hawaiians.
  • Qualified Native Hawaiian faculty members are employed in all disciplines at the University.
  • Native Hawaiian values are included in its decision making and practices.
  • Hawaiians hold leadership roles in the UH administration.
  • The University of Hawai'i is the foremost authority on Native Hawaiian scholarship.
  • The University is responsive to the needs of the Hawaiian community and, with community input, implements programs to address the needs of Native Hawaiians and other underrepresented groups.
  • The University fosters and promotes Hawaiian culture and language at all its campuses.
The UH Community Colleges are critical to the success of this plan as community colleges are the main entry point for Native Hawaiian students into the UH System. While there has been notable improvements in both access and success for Native Hawaiians within the UH Community Colleges, there remains much to be done. The student success agenda in this plan incorporates these concepts and benchmarks but there is also much more to be done in creating the leadership, community, and cultural environment across the UHCC campuses.

To guide this commitment, a formal Native Hawaiian advisory council, composed of campus Pūko'a and Native Hawaiian councils from each campus will be created to advise the Vice-President for Community Colleges on progress toward the goal of being a model indigenous serving institution. Each campus is also expected to incorporate the Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao recommendations into the campus strategic plans.

Professional Development Programs
The continued development of high bandwidth digital technologies, on-line resources and education, and the use of mobile devices that provide ready access to information and communication are changing the pedagogy of the modern University. These technologies create the opportunity to change the group interaction of faculty and students from information exchange to information processing and analysis. These "flipped" classrooms hold promise for better learning experiences and better quality but also represent a significant change in how the UH Community Colleges teach and how students learn.

As part of this plan, the UH Community Colleges will:

  • Develop a professional development program for faculty teaching in online courses, including a certification and continuing education program for all online instructors. The professional development program will also create an environment for faculty to share best practices and outcomes in the online environment.
  • Develop a professional development and innovation program to allow faculty to learn, experiment, and test various strategies employing digital teaching, flipped classrooms, collaborative learning, and new approaches to college learning and student success.

The UH Community Colleges experienced rapid enrollment growth from 2006 through 2011 with student enrollment rising from 25,206 in 2006 to 34,100 in 2011. This growth was initially fueled by intentional expansion of course offerings to address unmet demand and then dramatically impacted by the recession. Since 2012 the enrollment has declined but still remains 23% above the 2006 level.

In developing this plan, the focus was less on trying to predict enrollment through 2021 than to identify key enrollment sectors that seemed to be underserved and therefore should be a focus for system efforts to extend access. Should these efforts be successful, there will be a natural positive impact on enrollment but it must be understood that any growth is also dependent on having the resources to assure that students continue to have the support they need and the programs can maintain the quality they require. The targeted enrollment areas are as follows:

Recent High School Graduates
The Hawai'i Department of Education has established a goal of having 65% of its graduates enrolled in post-secondary education. Statewide, the current going rate is at 54% but there are significant differences in going rates among the different high schools in the State. The UH Community Colleges are the likely steppingstones for those students not currently enrolling in post-secondary education. Accordingly, the enrollment analysis below examines the high school enrollment and graduation projections over the next six years, identifies the going rate gap for each of the public high schools against the 65% target, aligns the high schools with the community colleges in the region, and challenges the UH Community Colleges to take responsibility for working with the DOE to close 80% of those gaps over the next six years through enrollment in the UH Community Colleges.

High School Graduate Enrollment Targets by Campus
  Baseline 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
HAW 440 474 509 541 575 607 640 666
HON 429 436 443 453 463 471 479 486
KAP 794 806 815 827 836 849 856 866
KAU 204 209 215 221 228 234 241 245
LEE 965 1,045 1,097 1,150 1,195 1,243 1,290 1,329
MAU 430 455 481 506 529 550 570 590
WIN 245 261 277 293 307 318 328 339
UHCC 3,507 3,687 3,837 3,989 4,133 4,271 4,405 4,520
                +1,013

Efforts to achieve this increased going rate will include:

  • Developing dual credit enrollment programs so that high school students may earn at least six college credits before graduation;
  • Developing clear programs of study between K-12 and the UH Community Colleges, including in various Career and Technical Education and STEM related fields;
  • Conducting extensive outreach to potential students and their parents beginning in the middle school years, particularly for those schools identified as having low post-secondary going rates;
  • Providing information and assistance with financial aid support; and
  • Working with the DOE to improve college readiness through 12th grade remediation for college bound students, summer bridge programs, curricular alignment, and other efforts to reduce the need for remediation.
High School Non-Completers and GED Recipients
A significant portion of the adult population does not have a high school diploma. This includes many students who leave their high school without graduation. Currently, the GED credential can currently only be earned through the Department of Education Adult Schools. While under Hawai'i law, individuals without a GED could enroll in a community college when they reach the age of 18, access to Federal financial aid requires that the individual earn a GED before enrolling. The overarching goal is to develop, in cooperation with the Adult Schools, a system that not only provides the student with a GED but which also prepares them for entry into community college programs.

The enrollment target is to increase the numbers of such GED recipients in the community colleges by 2% per year over the next six years.

GED Recipients Enrollment Targets by Campus
  Baseline 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
HAW 210 214 218 223 227 232 236 241
HON 260 265 271 276 281 287 293 299
KAP 309 315 321 328 334 341 348 355
KAU 100 102 104 106 108 110 113 115
LEE 375 383 390 398 406 414 422 431
MAU 314 320 327 333 340 347 354 361
WIN 211 215 220 224 228 233 238 242
UHCC 1,779 1,815 1,851 1,888 1,926 1,964 2,003 2,044
                +265

This target will be reached through coordinated programs with the Department of Education Adult Schools to align the adult education and GED preparation courses with community college curricula and college readiness. Additionally, the current iCAN model of the UH Community Colleges that incorporates workforce readiness and academic skills for underprepared students will be expanded in conjunction with state workforce readiness programs for GED holders.

Pacific Islander Students
Pacific Islanders are the one minority population that is not currently enrolled in the UH Community Colleges at population parity. While Pacific Islanders make up 4% of Hawai'i's population, they comprise only 3% of the UHCC enrollment. The enrollment target is to eliminate this access gap by 2021.

Pacific Islander Enrollment Targets by Campus
  Baseline 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
HAW 103 120 120 122 124 126 128 130
HON 133 167 167 173 179 186 193 199
KAP 123 153 153 156 159 162 165 167
KAU 29 25 25 26 27 28 29 30
LEE 170 243 243 295 347 399 451 503
MAU 70 78 78 87 96 105 114 122
WIN 43 65 65 82 99 116 133 150
UHCC 671 851 851 941 1,031 1,122 1,213 1,301
                +630

This target will be reached through extensive outreach into the Pacific Islander communities, working in cooperation with other University outreach programs and community agencies. The outreach program will also rely on peer mentors drawing from successful Pacific Islander students within the University or from the Pacific region.

Working Adults
Community colleges serve a significant portion of the working age adult population. These individuals could be seeking new careers, advances in their current career, or just specific skills needed to maintain or advance in their job. Often, these working adult students attend part-time, during evening and weekend hours, or through distance education as they balance work, family and college.

Establishing a target for this population is somewhat arbitrary but for planning purposes, the goal is to increase the participation rate from the current 2.25% of adults between the ages of 25 to 44 to 4%. The targets are based on the population statistics in the service areas of the colleges.

Working Adults (25-44) Enrollment Targets by Campus
  Baseline 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
HAW 983 1,134 1,265 1,395 1,526 1,635 1,657 1,744
HON 1,371 1,494 1,590 1,685 1,828 1,924 2,019 2,115
KAP 2,293 2,542 2,727 2,911 3,187 3,372 3,556 3,740
KAU 416 446 479 512 561 594 627 661
LEE 1,965 2,120 2,298 2,477 2,744 2,923 3,101 3,280
MAU 1,242 1,339 1,423 1,506 1,548 1,590 1,632 1,674
WIN 788 856 918 979 1,071 1,132 1,194 1,255
UHCC 9,058 9,932 10,699 11,466 12,467 13,171 13,787 14,468
                +5,410

Strategies to expand this enrollment include workplace based programs in conjunction with major employers, well-designed distance or hybrid education programs, cohort based programs for part-time students, year round programs at regular tuition rates, and full implementation of Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) techniques.

International Students
The final targeted enrollment category is international students. International students also bring a rich diversity to the UHCC campuses and help create an environment where Hawai'i residents become more aware of and able to work in the global economy.

International students also represent a significant revenue source as well. Hawai'i as a state has targeted education as a potential economic import sector and community colleges can play a role in developing that economic sector.

International Student Enrollment Targets by Campus

 

Fall 2015
Base

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

HAW

78

80

83

85

88

90

93

HON

51

53

54

56

57

59

61

KAP

751

774

797

821

845

871

897

KAU

12

12

13

13

14

14

14

LEE

117

121

124

128

132

136

140

MAU

58

60

62

63

65

67

69

WIN

13

13

14

14

15

15

16

UHCC

1,030

1,061

1,093

1,126

1,159

1,194

1,230

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

NOTE: International student definition changed by UH System in Spring 2016.
Goals were reset in 2016. Growth at 3% per year.

The UHCC campuses are all at different stages in their ability to attract and serve international students. Ensuring that international students receive English language support, housing support, and advising and assistance with adapting to a new environment are all critical. Student pathways that lead through the community colleges to baccalaureate programs are also valuable in both recruiting and serving international students. With support from the UHCC System Office, each college will develop its plan to reach these goals.

Student Year-to-Year Retention
While not a specific enrollment target, the analysis also considered the impact on enrollment if the student success goal of increasing the year-to-year retention of students within the community colleges from 50% to 65% were to be achieved. The graph below illustrates the enrollment impact of this retention improvement.

Year-to-Year Persistence/Retention
Cohort Size and 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
HAW 48% (861) 48%
(413)
48%
(413)
50%
(431)
53%
(456)
56%
(482)
59%
(508)
62%
(534)
64%
(550)
65%
(560)
HON 44% (923) 44%
(406)
44%
(406)
46%
(425)
49%
(452)
51%
(471)
54%
(498)
58%
(535)
62%
(572)
65%
(600)
KAP 53% (1,571) 53%
(834)
53%
(834)
54%
(848)
56%
(880)
58%
(911)
60%
(943)
62%
(974)
64%
(1,005)
65%
(1,021)
KAU 52% (341) 52%
(177)
52%
(177)
54%
(184)
56%
(191)
58%
(198)
60%
(205)
62%
(211)
64%
(218)
65%
(222)
LEE 50% (1,612) 50%
(806)
50%
(806)
52%
(838)
54%
(870)
56%
(903)
58%
(935)
60%
(967)
62%
(999)
65%
(1,048)
MAU 48% (788) 48%
(378)
48%
(378)
51%
(402)
53%
(418)
56%
(441)
59%
(465)
61%
(481)
63%
(496)
65%
(512)
WIN 46% (547) 46%
(252)
46%
(252)
49%
(268)
51%
(279)
54%
(295)
57%
(312)
60%
(328)
63%
(345)
65%
(356)
UHCC 49% (6,643) 49%
(3,267)
49%
(3,267)
50%
(3,322)
51%
(3,388)
54%
(3,587)
57%
(3,787)
60%
(3,986)
63%
(4,185)
65%
(4,318)
Based on AtD 2013 Entering cohort number and growing persistence to 65%. Actual numbers will change with the size of each year's entering cohort.

Overall Targeted Growth
With the caveat that many factors can impact student enrollment and the UHCC capacity in serving students, the combined impact of the above targeted enrollment sectors is as follows. This graph does not represent enrollment targets but does provide a framework against which to judge our progress in serving these underrepresented students.



In developing this plan consideration was also given to an examination of which structures that have been employed in the past six years need to be retained and what new structures might further ensure the success of the plan itself. Accordingly, the following structures and/or policies will be deployed in support of the plan over the next six years.

UHCC Strategic Planning Council
The UHCC Strategic Planning Council consists of the seven chancellors, seven faculty senate chairs, seven student government leaders from each of the campuses and vice president and associate vice presidents for the community colleges. The UHCC Strategic Planning Council is created in policy and meets twice a year in full session to review progress toward the goals of the plans and to make adjustments as needed over the planning period. The UHCC Strategic Planning Council also provides a forum to discuss issues that may have arisen that impact the direction or success of the plan.

The UHCC Strategic Planning Council will continue to serve in this broad oversight capacity but with two additional functions:

  • The Council will analyze the planning information generated by the Workforce Planning and Management System to help plan the long-term development and delivery of degree programs across the system.
  • Each fiscal year, the Council will make recommendations on the allocations and broad purposes of the innovation funds. These allocations will be for broad purposes and the Council will not evaluate individual proposals or activities funded within the broad categories defined by the allocations.
UHCC Student Success Council
In order to provide more direct involvement of the academic administrative and faculty leadership in the implementation of the plan, particularly with the Hawai'i Graduation Initiative, a new UHCC Student Success Council will be created that will include among its members:
  • Chief academic officers of each campus;
  • Chief student services officers of each campus;
  • A faculty member from each campus appointed by the chancellor. The faculty member may be drawn from the campus student success committee or other faculty governance organization; and
  • Selected support personnel from the institution research staff within the UH Community Colleges and from the UH System Office associated with student success.
The UHCC Student Success Council will meet bi-monthly and provide a regular forum to identify issues arising in the implementation of the plan, policy questions that need to be addressed, possible changes in practice, and to inform the UHCC Strategic Planning Council or the UHCC Council of Chancellors on major issues needing attention.

The UHCC Student Success Council would be supported by a series of cross-campus committees of practitioners that are focused on one of the critical components of the plan. These committees serve as implementation committees, as policy committees, and/or as innovation/evaluation committees. The actual number of the committees may change over the course of the plan but initially would include:
  • Graduation and time-to-degree;
  • Transfer;
  • Co-requisite remediation; and
  • UHCC Hawai'i Papa O Ke Ao implementation.
The UHCC Student Success Committee would also serve to help organize the Hawai'i Strategy Institute which would continue as a major annual gathering to discuss, debate, and learn about progress, both within our system and from our sister colleges, on the student success agenda.

Achieving the Dream and Other National Initiatives
The UHCCs would continue to participate as a member of Achieving the Dream and with other national student success efforts, including those involving other parts of the UH System.

Performance Funding
The UHCCs would continue to provide $6.5 million in performance funding to the campuses based on their degree of attainment of selected targeted goals. The metrics and associated weights for performance funding include:

Graduates (Associate Degrees & CAs) 35%
Native Hawaiian Graduates (Associate Degrees & CAs) 10%
STEM Graduates (UHCC Associate Degrees & CAs + UH STEM baccalaureate graduates) 10%
PELL Graduates (Associate Degrees & CAs) 10%
Annual Transfers to Baccalaureate Colleges 35%

Innovation Funding
A pool of $1.25 million per year will be made available for innovation and implementation activities associated with the strategic plan. These funds include providing for the expenses of Achieving the Dream and the Hawai'i Strategy Institute. The allocations and broad purposes of the funds will be established annually based on the recommendations of the UHCC Strategic Planning Council.

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